Term:Encryption

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DoD 8580.02-R

Encryption - The use of an algorithmic process to transform data into a form in which there is a low probability of assigning meaning without the use of a confidential process or key. DL1.19.

GAO-09-232G

Encryption - Encryption is the conversion of data into a form, called a cipher text, which cannot be easily understood by unauthorized people.

NIST IR 7298

Encryption - Conversion of plaintext to ciphertext through the use of a cryptographic algorithm. SOURCE: FIPS 185

NIST IR 7298

Encryption - Encryption is the conversion of data into a form, called a ciphertext, which cannot be easily understood by unauthorized people. SOURCE: SP 800-46

NIST IR 7298

Encryption - The process of changing plaintext into ciphertext for the purpose of security or privacy. SOURCE: SP 800-21 [2nd Ed]

NIST SP 800-101

Encryption - Any procedure used in cryptography to convert plain text into cipher text to prevent anyone but the intended recipient from reading that data.

NIST SP 800-124

Encryption - Any procedure used in cryptography to convert plaintext into ciphertext to prevent anyone but the intended recipient from reading that data.

NIST SP 800-38A

Encryption (Enciphering)- The process of a confidentiality mode that transforms usable data into an unreadable form.

NIST SP 800-46

Encryption - Encryption is the conversion of data into a form, called a ciphertext, which cannot be easily understood by unauthorized people. Decryption is the process of converting encrypted data back into its original form, so it can be understood. The use of encryption/decryption is as old as the art of communication. A cipher, often incorrectly called a "code," can be employed to keep unauthorized parties from obtaining the contents of transmissions. (Technically, a code is a means of representing a signal without the intent of keeping it secret; examples are Morse code and ASCII.) Simple ciphers include the substitution of letters for numbers, the rotation of letters in the alphabet, and the "scrambling" of voice signals by inverting the sideband frequencies. More complex ciphers work according to sophisticated mathematical algorithms that rearrange the data bits in digital signals. In order to easily recover the contents of an encrypted signal, the correct decryption key is required. The key is an algorithm that "undoes" the work of the encryption algorithm. Alternatively, a computer can be used in an attempt to "break" the cipher. The more complex the encryption algorithm, the more difficult it becomes to eavesdrop on the communications without access to the key.

NIST SP 800-47

Encryption - The translation of data into a form that is unintelligible without a deciphering mechanism.

NIST SP 800-57P1

Encryption - The process of changing plaintext into ciphertext using a cryptographic algorithm and key.

NIST SP 800-57P2

Encryption - The process of changing plaintext into ciphertext using a cryptographic algorithm and key.

NIST SP 800-67v1.1

Encryption - The process of transforming plaintext into ciphertext.

NIST SP 800-67

Encryption - The process of transforming plaintext into ciphertext.

NIST SP 800-72

Encryption - Any procedure used in cryptography to convert plain text into cipher text to prevent anyone but the intended recipient from reading that data.

NIST SP 800-82 Final Draft

Encryption - Cryptographic transformation of data (called "plaintext") into a form (called "ciphertext") that conceals the data's original meaning to prevent it from being known or used. If the transformation is reversible, the corresponding reversal process is called "decryption", which is a transformation that restores encrypted data to its original state. [RFC 2828, Internet Security Glossary, May 2000, http://rfc.net/rfc2828.html.]